Fryeburg Academy in Maine denies yearbook photos of junior shooter

Well, at the risk of coming off as a gun-nut, I want you to be aware of this bigotry: Gun Bias Check (from Xavier’s blog).

The short of it is, young Joshua Enos is a trap shooter and submitted a senior photo of himself with his shotgun (unloaded, open, safe) to the Fryeburg Academy yearbook committee. Upon denial, he tried a photo of himself with his trophies, but was again denied. The reason for both denials is that there were guns in the pictures (the trophies depicted guns too).

I can understand denying a photo of a kid brandishing a gun unsafely. I’m all for discouraging that sort of behavior. However, guns are not going away, shouldn’t we promote the safe use of them instead of denying their existence?

Pull your head out of the sand, Fryeburg Academy. Addressing social issues means sometimes facing them head-on, not censoring out anything gun-related as evil.

This kid is proud of his sport. Just as a basketball or football senior might pose with a ball, he has posed with his trap gun.

Author: Davin Granroth

Davin is Chief Operating Officer for Covenant Eyes, Inc. in Owosso, MI, USA, where he gets to mix his background in user experience design, research, and strategy with the operation of a software company. For more, see his LinkedIn profile.

One thought on “Fryeburg Academy in Maine denies yearbook photos of junior shooter”

  1. Well, I just emailed the headmaster at Fryeburg Academy. Here is a copy of the message.

    —————————–
    Good morning Daniel,

    I’m sure you’ve heard a bit on this already. It sounds like Fryeburg Academy struck a cord out there.

    I realize I’m not in the context of your school, your community, and I do not know Josh Enos, but on a basis of principle, allow me to make an argument for giving the green-light on Josh’s trap shooting photos.

    First, guns are not going away. They are entrenched in our American culture, and there are many subcultures that value guns in a variety of ways–some good, some bad.

    For instance, gang subcultures where guns are bought and sold illegally, drive-by shootings happen, and respect for civic authority is lacking are certainly not to be encouraged. In that context, guns are part of the problem, or perhaps a symptom of a deeper problem.

    However, there are other subcultures in which gun safety is openly discussed, civic authority is honored, and shooting sports are a core part of life. These values run across many communities across America, and often manifest in organized, disciplined, and fun competitive shooting tournaments and practices. As evidence of these values across the world, there is something to the tune of a dozen recognized Olympic events that involve the shooting sports.

    Because, in America, we will have guns in our lives, those positive values associated with guns need encouraging and need to be shared. The more our society sees positive role models for gun safety and gun values, the better off we’ll be. This can help offset the destructive roles we see so often.

    By censoring those photos, Fryeburg Academy is silencing positive gun values that should instead be celebrated, for the benefit of our communities.

    -drg

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